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UK: Tentative deal reached with Purdue Pharma, maker of OxyContin - The Washington Post

Found: Wed Sep 11 14:01:43 2019 PDT
Source: Washington Post (DC)
Copyright: 2019 The Washington Post Company
Contact: letters@washpost.com
Website: http://www.washingtonpost.com/
Details: http://www.mapinc.org/media/491
Webpage: https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/purd... [translate]
Author: Aaron C. Davis, Aaron C. Davis Investigative reporter
Newshawk: http://drugpolicycentral.com/bot/


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Tentative deal reached with Purdue Pharma, maker of OxyContin - The Washington Post Tentative deal reached with Purdue Pharma, maker of OxyContin - The Washington Post

Health

Purdue Pharma reaches tentative deal in federal opioid lawsuits

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Bottles of prescription painkiller OxyContin pills, made by Purdue Pharma (George Frey/Reuters)

By Aaron C. Davis ,

Aaron C. Davis

Investigative reporter

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Scott Higham

Investigative reporter

Email Bio Follow September 11 at 1:50 PM

Purdue Pharma, manufacturer of blockbuster painkiller OxyContin, has reached a tentative settlement with 22 states and more than 2,000 cities and counties that sued the company over its role in the opioid crisis of the past two decades, people close to the deal said Wednesday.

The executive committee of lawyers representing cities, counties and other groups in a federal lawsuit against Purdue and other drug companies is recommending the deal be accepted. But some state attorneys general, who sued Purdue and its owners, the Sackler family, in state courts are still opposed to a deal.

Under terms of a plan negotiated for months, the Sacklers would relinquish control of Stamford, Conn.-based Purdue Pharma. The company would declare bankruptcy and be resurrected as a trust whose main purpose would be to combat the opioid epidemic.

If the deal becomes final, it would be the first comprehensive settlement in the broad legal effort to hold drug companies accountable for their role in the opioid epidemic. To date, Purdue has also settled with one state, Oklahoma, for $270 million, and won a victory when a North Dakota judge threw out the state case against the company.

The deal also would mark the demise of Purdue, the company widely blamed for its role in driving the prescription opioid epidemic as it spread in the late 1990s and the first years of this century. In 2007, Purdue and three of its executives pleaded guilty to criminal charges of misleading doctors and the public about the safety of OxyContin and paid a $635 million fine.

On Wednesday, the divide over the settlement broke down largely along party lines, with most Republican state attorneys general in favor of it and Democrats largely opposed.

Pennsylvania's Democratic attorney general, Josh Shapiro, who tried to negotiate a settlement he could accept, opposes the final deal and has vowed to sue the Sacklers personally. Another Democratic opponent, North Carolina attorney general, Josh Stein, said Wednesday he would do the same.

"These people are among the most responsible for the trail of death and destruction the opioid epidemic has left in its wake," Stein said.

But Ohio's Republican attorney general, Dave Yost, backs the agreement. "The proposed settlement with Purdue provides the greatest certainty for all Ohioans to receive relief as quickly as possible in light of rumored bankruptcy," said a spokeswoman for Yost.

The deal was said to be worth $10 billion to $12 billion, including a $3 billion payment from the Sacklers. It also would include at least $1.5 billion from the sale of the family's international drug conglomerate, Mundipharma, according to documents and people close to the talks.

The federal plaintiffs and many attorneys general apparently felt the proposal was as good as they could get. The lawyers for the cities and counties agreed to recommend that the municipalities "move forward in support of the current proposal, subject to satisfactory documentation of the essential terms and final documents," said Paul J. Hanly, Jr., Paul T. Farrell Jr. and Joseph F. Rice, three of the leaders of that group. "We feel good progress has and will continue to be made."

But some states objected that the Sacklers were not contributing enough cash from their personal fortunes, built almost entirely on the sale of OxyContin and taken out of the company in recent years, according to court papers filed by some states.

Connecticut Attorney General William Tong said he remained opposed to any deal because of that.

"The scope and scale of the pain, death and destruction that Purdue and the Sacklers have caused far exceeds anything that has been offered thus far," he said in a statement.

Another major concern is that the deal relies in significant measure on the assumed value of Purdue's assets and the sale of a subsidiary. States opposing it fear these values may be overestimated, and some of settlement money may never materialize.

It was not clear Wednesday whether the Sacklers had agreed to increase their personal contribution to the settlement or whether other terms had changed.

Still pending is the mammoth federal case in Cleveland against other drug companies, known as a "multidistrict litigation" or MDL, where the lawsuits from cities, counties, Indian tribes, hospitals and other groups have been consolidated. Judge Dan Aaron Polster has presided over that litigation, urging the parties to settle before trial so that money can be funneled quickly into drug treatment, emergency care, law enforcement and other local needs.

The federal trial is scheduled to begin in mid-October with two test cases, Cuyahoga and Summit counties, as the first plaintiffs. Meanwhile, the more than 40 lawsuits against drug companies are wending their way through state courts. A growing number of states also have sued the Sackler family personally.

Oklahoma, the first state case to go to trial, last month won a $572 million verdict against Johnson & Johnson. In addition to settling with Purdue before the trial, it reached an agreement with Teva Pharmaceuticals, a generic drugmaker, for $85 million.

Although the state cases are not in Polster's jurisdiction, he has urged a broad settlement that includes them.

"There's an incredible incentive to make a deal before bankruptcy, because that would make the process much less expensive for the states and cities," said Adam Zimmerman, a professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. If Purdue sought bankruptcy protection without a settlement, "we might see any kind of arrangement tied up in bankruptcy court for a very long time. It could be years," he added.

Yost, who wants the states to control the legal effort against the pharmaceutical industry, has asked a federal appeals court to delay or halt the federal trial. Another 13 states and the District of Columbia have filed briefs in support of that effort, according to Yost's office.

Yost criticized using two Ohio counties as "bellwether" cases, saying they represent only a tiny portion of the state's 88 counties.

"The rest of Ohio -- and Ohio itself -- is being left behind in the MDL lawsuit in Cleveland," he said late last month. "The hardest-hit counties of Appalachia and the vast majority of the state are being asked to take a number and wait -- and that wait could delay or prevent justice."

Zimmerman characterized the conflict as a struggle for control of the legal process.

"I think the main motivation [for Yost] has to do with who holds the balance of power with respect to negotiating a global settlement," he said. "This is kind of a Hail Mary."

The prescription drug epidemic has taken more than 200,000 lives via overdoses since 1999, according to federal statistics. Another 200,000 deaths are blamed on overdoses from heroin and illegal fentanyl smuggled into the country from China and Mexico.

The trials target drug manufacturers, distributors and retailers, and there are divisions among the defendants as well as among the states. Manufacturers, for example, have raised different legal arguments than distributors.

Sacklers could hold on to most of personal fortune in proposed Purdue settlement

Opioid crackdown forces pain patients to taper off drugs they say they need

As lawyers zero in on drug companies, a reckoning may be coming

Comments

Aaron C. Davis Aaron Davis is an investigative reporter who has covered local, state and federal government, as well as the aviation industry and law enforcement. Davis shared in winning the Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting in 2018. Follow

Lenny Bernstein Lenny Bernstein covers health and medicine. He started as an editor on The Washington Post's National desk in 2000 and has worked in Metro and Sports. Follow

Joel Achenbach Joel Achenbach covers science and politics for the National desk. He has been a staff writer for The Post since 1990.

Scott Higham Scott Higham is a Pulitzer-Prize winning investigative reporter at The Washington Post, where he has worked on Metro, National and Foreign projects since 2000. Follow

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analysis of article text


prohibitionist hits:0 government drug warrior (prohibition_agency) hits:0 propaganda (drugwar_propaganda) hits:18 legalization hits:0 drug_reformer hits:0 reform_referenda hits:0 cannabis hits:0 stimulant hits:0 narcotic hits:15 hallucinogen hits:0
    prohibitionist     prohibition_agency     drugwar_propaganda     legalization     drug_reformer
    reform_referenda     cannabis     stimulant     narcotic     hallucinogen
                        
                        


incarceration/prison mentioned? NO - the issue of prison or incarceration was NOT mentioned in this article .

propaganda analysis


explicit prohibition propaganda (explicit_propaganda) hits:0 hated group (propaganda_theme1) hits:0 madness, violence, illness (propaganda_theme2) hits:9 survival of society (propaganda_theme3) hits:1 gateway, use is abuse (propaganda_theme4) hits:0 children (propaganda_theme5) hits:0 demonize, war, epidemic (propaganda_theme6) hits:8 total prohibition (propaganda_theme7) hits:0 dissent opposed (propaganda_theme8) hits:0
EXP - explicit prohibition propaganda (explicit_propaganda) GRP - hated group (propaganda_theme1) MAD - madness, violence, illness (propaganda_theme2)
SOC - survival of society (propaganda_theme3) USE - gateway, use is abuse (propaganda_theme4) KID - children (propaganda_theme5)
WAR - demonize, war, epidemic (propaganda_theme6) TOT - total prohibition (propaganda_theme7) DIS - dissent opposed (propaganda_theme8)



conceptevidencehitslinks
 drug of abuse implied / mentioned

drug related
[news] [concept]

illegal drugs  
drugwar_propaganda : a drug war propaganda event, campaign release, slogan, or themepropaganda

drugwar propaganda
[news] [concept]

propaganda theme2 propaganda theme3 propaganda theme6 Why Are Americans So Easy to Manipulate? (Bruce E Levine, 2012)
Classic Modern Drug Propaganda
Themes in Chemical Prohibition
Drug War Propaganda (kindle edition)
propaganda_theme2 : drug war propaganda theme: madness, violence, illness caused by drugsmadness, violence, illness

propaganda theme2 70%
[news] [concept]

"overdoses" "criminal" "motivation" "death" "deaths" "fear"9Madness Crime Violence Illness (propaganda theme 2)
drugwarfacts.org/crime.htm
drugwarfacts.org/causes.htm
Distortion 18: Cannabis and Mental Illness
No, marijuana use doesn't lower your IQ (10/2014)
propaganda_theme3 : drug war propaganda theme: survival of societysurvival of society

propaganda theme3 65%
[news] [concept]

"the country"1Survival of Society (propaganda theme 3)
The "Nation" as a Device To Create a Psychological Crowd
propaganda_theme6 : drug war propaganda theme: demonize; use of drugs is epidemic; wardemonize, war, epidemic

propaganda theme6
[news] [concept]

"drug epidemic" "epidemic" "combat" "struggle"8Demonize, War (propaganda theme 6)
List of Wars on Concepts
Perpetual war
The Failed War on Drugs (2012)
 drug of abuse

illegal drugs
[news] [concept]

narcotic  
 drugs
[news] [concept]
various drugs  
 psychoactive chemical

chemicals
[news] [concept]

heroin opiate erowid.org/chemicals/chemicals.s...
 psychoactive plant

plants
[news] [concept]

tobacco erowid.org/plants/plants.shtml
 psychoactive pharmaceutical

pharms
[news] [concept]

fentanyl oxycodone erowid.org/pharms/pharms.shtml
 euphoric depressant
[news] [concept]
heroin opiate  
 analgesic
[news] [concept]
fentanyl heroin opiate oxycodone  
 anesthetic
[news] [concept]
fentanyl  
opioid : opiate-like but synthetic drugsopioid

opioid
[news] [concept]

"opioid" oxycodone8Managing Pain
 narcotic
[news] [concept]
opioid opiate Managing Pain
opiate : a substance derived from the opium poppyopiate
[news] [concept]
heroin Managing Pain
 heroin
[news] [concept]
"heroin"1google.com/search?q=Alfred+McCoy...
mapinc.org/heroin.htm
drugwarfacts.org/heroin.htm
Managing Pain
 Tobacco

tobacco
[news] [concept]

"cigarettes"1erowid.org/plants/tobacco/
Tobacco: Stunts Teens Growth
 Fentanyl

fentanyl
[news] [concept]

"fentanyl"1erowid.org/pharms/fentanyl/
 oxycodone

oxycodone
[news] [concept]

OxyContin Managing Pain
 OxyContin
[news] [concept]
"OxyContin"6mapinc.org/oxycontin.htm
Managing Pain
 various drugs
[news] [concept]
"Pharmaceuticals" "pharmaceutical" "drug" "drugmaker" "drugs"14 
 school
[news] [concept]
"School"2ssdp.org/
 mainstream (controlled) media

msm
[news] [concept]

mockingbird Mainstream Media
whowhatwhy.org/2014/04/09/media-...
archive.lewrockwell.com/orig14/a...
Michael Levine, Mainstream Media: The Drug War Shills
beforeitsnews.com/alternative/20...
Mainstream Media: The Most Significant Threat To Freedom
msm.rt.com/
sputniknews.com/europe/20160225/...
 Mockingbird / Wurlitzer; US intel-controlled media

mockingbird
[news] [concept]

"Reuters" "Washington Post"6Operation Mockingbird - Mighty Wurlitzer
carlbernstein.com/magazine cia a...
US Media Conceals News (2013)
Two of the Largest American Newspapers Opine in Favor of Allowing States to Legalize Marijuana (2012)
reuters.com/article/2014/07/27/u...
https://web.archive.org/web/2013...
Propaganda 101: Operation Mockingbird Continues (2015)

st:0.01 fo:0 s:0 d:0 c:0.01 db:0.117 a:0.63 m:0.28 t:1.24 (f)


text of article used for CRITICAL ANALYSIS, under FAIR USE provisions of the Copyright Act of 1976, 17 U.S.C. § 107, et al.


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    article tags



     

    mockingbird concept - documented US intel controlled media: newspapers, tv, radio - various press associated with known intel ops such as, "Operation Mockingbird", "Mighty Wurlitzer", etc.
    msm concept - mainstream media - corporate, government controlled press: newspaper, tv, radio, websites; press associated with known intel ops such as, "Operation Mockingbird", "Mighty Wurlitzer", Tavistock Institute, etc.
    school concept
    various_drugs concept - general terms for drugs
    OxyContin concept - a time-release oxycodone brand
    oxycodone concept - a type of opioid
    fentanyl concept - Fentanyl is a short-acting synthetic opiate analgesic which is active at very low doses. Its effects are compared to heroin and it has been sold on the street as heroin, causing some deaths. (N-(1-phenethyl-4-piperidyl)propionanilide)
    tobacco concept - Tobacco is an annual or bi-annual growing 1-3 meters tall with large sticky leaves that contain nicotine. Native to the Americas, tobacco has a long history of use as an shamanic inebriant and stimulant. It is extremely popular and well-known for its addictive potential. (Solanaceae, Nicotiana, rustica; tabacum L.; ...)
    heroin concept - heroin, heroine, diamorphine
    opiate concept - a substance derived from the opium poppy
    opiate
    narcotic concept - a drug that dulls senses, relieves pain, induces sleep
    opioid concept - opiate-like but synthetic drugs
    opioid
    anesthetic concept
    analgesic concept
    euphoric_depressant concept
    pharms concept - Psychoactive Pharmaceuticals are over-the-counter or prescription chemicals approved for human medicinal use, with mind- or emotion-altering properties
    plants concept - Plants listed in this section are those which have been used by humans for their mind- or emotion-altering properties.
    chemicals concept - Psychoactive Chemicals are chemicals which have mind- or emotion-altering properties.
    drugs concept
    illegal_drugs concept - drugs of abuse, so-called
    propaganda_theme6 concept - drug war propaganda theme: demonize; use of drugs is epidemic; war
    propaganda_theme6
    propaganda_theme3 concept - drug war propaganda theme: survival of society
    propaganda_theme3
    propaganda_theme2 concept - drug war propaganda theme: madness, violence, illness caused by drugs
    propaganda_theme2
    drugwar_propaganda concept - a drug war propaganda event, campaign release, slogan, or theme
    drugwar_propaganda
    drug_related concept - related to illegal drugs and prohibition