Bot  

search:

fast-breaking news analysis about drug policy and illegal drugs

now scanning: Germany's Green Energy Meltdown
Mon Nov 20 01:16:04 2017

The Story of Your Enslavement
five star (video)

Prison for Profit
The Rise of the Prison Industrial Complex
Prison Profiteers (2013)


Here

home   about

MAP scholar

propaganda news

canada uk

australia pot news

psychedelics news

tag cloud topics

concept dictionary

feeds   stats

user analysis

contact us   faq   chat

login register


Mapinc

news hawking!

latest

drugnews

DrugSense

A Drug War Carol

No Victim/No Crime - fija.org

FREE NJWEEDMAN
2017 FREE NJWEEDMAN
May 3, 2017 - please help Ed Forchion


Need facts? See: DrugWarFacts.org

this bot site is Hosted By DrugPolicyCentral! ... Please help us keep going!

Themes in Chemical Prohibition: Sec 3
NIDA: Themes in Chemical Prohibition, William L. White, 1979
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/History/ticp.html

3. Survival of the Culture is Pictured as Dependent on Prohibition or Continued Prohibition of the Drug

Society, Nation, Country
US flag reads: We the People Stay Drug Free
"...elimination of the drug and its use is thus characterized as crucial for the survival of the culture"

Implicit in the attribution of society's problems to the use of particular chemicals is the assumption and implication that these problems will disappear as prohibition becomes effective The elimination of the drug and its use is thus characterized as crucial for the survival of the culture. Such claims have been characteristic of nearly all prohibitionist movements. For example, the following editorial warning appeared in the New York Times on June 28, 1884:

  • The decadence of Spain began when the Spaniards adopted cigarettes, and if this pernicious practice obtains among adult Americans the Ruin of the Republic is at hand. 31
  • Drug-Free AUSTRALIA, wrapped in the flag, carrying cross
    Scotland Against Drugs (For Punishment)
    Drug-Free AMERICA, wrapped in the flag - carrying star-formed cross, too
    the idea is to associate prohibition with community, nation, etc.

    Purley Baker writing in the Anti-Saloon League Yearbook of 1914 implores: "If our Republic is to be saved, the liquor traffic must be destroyed,"32 and Henry Ford speaking in support of alcohol prohibition stated the following in 1928:
  • "If the law were changed, we'd have to shut down our plants. Everything in the United States is keyed up to a new pace which started with Prohibition. The speed at which we run our motor cars, operate our intricate machinery, and generally live, would be impossible with liquor. No, there is no chance even for modification."33
  • (below) From the intro of the movie, "Reefer Madness" (1936). Richard Nixon echoes Reefer Madness with the same wording, declaring "drugs" to be "Public Enemy Number One" -- just like the movie, 35 years earlier.
    Marihuana is America's Public Enemy Number One!

    Such pronouncements on the presently illicit drugs have been echoed through the past decades perhaps culminating in the announcement by then President Richard M. Nixon in June, 1971 that "The problem has assumed the dimensions of a national emergency . . . America's Public Enemy No. 1 is drug abuse."34


  • breaking news items showing this theme
  • book: Drug War Propaganda
  • thesaurus entry (concept)

    [previous] [up] [next]

    [document mirrored from http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/History/ticp.html
    emphasis, bracketed comments, some illustrations are added]